Laws

COLOMBIA

Limited information only available for these topics

Access to Children
Adoption of Children
Age of Consent
Anti-Vilification
Artifical Insemination
Assisted Reproduction
Asylum / Refugees
Civil Unions
  Custody of Children
Discrimination
Estates, Wills
Fostering Children
Gender Identity
Harassment
Hate Crimes
  Health, Medical
HIV/Aids
Homosexuality
Immigration
Inheritance, Succession
In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF)
Marriage
  Military
Partners
Parenting
Property
Sodomy
Transgender, Transsexual
Violence
Wrongful Death

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Age of Consent Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

As at 1997, the age of consent for consensual sexual activity for women was 12 years and for men 14 years [R1.1].

R1.1 Interpol: Sexual Offences Against Children PDF 28.13kb (Accessed 17 NOV 10)
Annuities, Pensions, Superannuation Legislation/Cases/References
1.

Courts & Tribunals

On 26 February 2016, Inter-American Court of Human Rights ruled that Colombia violated the right to equality and non-discrimination of a gay man, who was denied a survivor pension after his partner had died, saying ''that no provision can diminish or limit a person’s rights on the basis of their sexual orientation''. It is the very first time the court has ruled on issues related to same-sex couples [C1.5], [R1.4].

On 11 May 2012, the Constitutional Court was reported to have ordered the Institute of Social Security (ISS) to award pension rights to the surviving gay partner of a dead Catholic priest [C1.3], [R1.2].

On 20 April 2012, the Constitutional Court was reported to have ruled that “The part of the Constitution that treats the concept of family as solely the union between a man and a woman is blatantly wrong … ” and that same-sex couples legally constitute a family, affording them the same access to a partner's pension fund and compensation packages as heterosexual couples, if proof can be provided they had been living together [R1.1].

C1.5 Sentenza (in Spanish): Case of Duque v. Colombia PDF 784.78kb 26 FEB 16
R1.4 ILGA LGBulletin#44: Inter-American Court of Human Rights holds Colombia accountable for violating right to equality and non-discrimination 15 APR 15
C1.3 Constitutional Court: Pedro v. Social Insurance Institution Case, T-716/11, 22 SEP 11 (in Spanish)
R1.2 GayStarNews: Colombian Catholic priest's gay partner wins his pension 11 MAY 12
R1.1 Colombia Reports: Colombia grants same-sex couples inheritance rights 20 APR 12
Assisted Reproduction, Artificial Insemination,
In Vitro Fertilisation, Surrogacy
Legislation/Cases/References
See also: [PARENTING]
R1.1
Children: Access, Custody, Visitation Legislation/Cases/References
See also: [PARENTING]
1.

Courts & Tribunals

In August 2012, in the legal union between Ana Leiderman and Veronica Botero, Leiderman, who gave birth after being artificially inseminated, has custody of the children. Botero has virtually no rights, or legal responsibilities, concerning them and the couple sought a review of the law by the Constitutional Court [R1.1].

R1.1 Washington Post: Colombia legal challenge could set precedent on gay couples’ familial rights in Latin America 10 AUG 12
Civil Unions, Partners: Domestic, Registered Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

On 10 April 2012, a total of 309 same-sex couples reportedly had entered into legal unions in the second half of 2011, following the 2009 Constitutional Court decision recognizing cohabitating same-sex couples as de facto unions that could be registered through a public deed before a notary or judge [R1.3].

On 28 January 2009, Constitutional Court ruled gay and lesbian couples are entitled to the same rights as straight couples in common-law marriages [R2.7].

In August 2003, Colombia decided to abandon its plans to legalise same sex relationships [R1.2].

See: 2. Courts & Tribunals below.

Previously:

In April 2003, the Colombian National Senate discussed the same-sex union bill (Project 043): "To recognize same-sex unions, its patrimonial effects and other rights" was drafted jointly by Senator Piedad Córdoba and LGBT activists [R1.1].

The bill would have recognized the existence of same-sex unions and the State's duty to protect them. To enter a same-sex union both partners would have needed to be of legal age, having lived together for at least two years and not be related by marriage or de facto union to someone else.

Unions would have had to be registered - and also dissolved - at Notaries. Those who wished to unify their assets would have had to draft a separate document to that aim. Assets acquired or inherited while the union was in force, would have been shared by both partners, as well as the products of joint work.

Partners entering a same-sex union would also have had rights to:

  1. Social security benefits on the same basis as de-facto unions
  2. Inheritance rights on the same basis as de-facto unions
  3. Workplace legislation benefits
  4. Make health-care related decisions when the other partner is unable to do so
  5. Mutual insurance benefits
  6. Mutual alimony

Jails and prisons would have had to grant the same benefits to same-sex union partners that are currently enjoyed by straight couples.

Same-sex union partners would have been included in all aspect of current legislation against domestic violence.

Article 8 was a non-discriminatory clause, making illegal to discriminate against any person based on "their sexual identity, gender or orientation".

Article 9 affirmed that the State has the duty to guarantee freedom of association among "persons of sexual orientation and gender identity that differs from that of the straight majority".

Article 10 mandated that the Education Ministry and its dependencies review school curricula at all levels to eliminate homophobic contents and to incorporate "clear and objective information about sexual orientation and gender identity" to the current sexual education materials. The same is required of State funded sexual and reproductive health services.

2.

Courts & Tribunals

In November 2010, Constitutional Court ruled 5–4 to dismiss a lawsuit, filed in September 2009, challenging the current civil code that prohibits marriage equality [R2.9].


In March 2009, Head of Colombia Diversa Marcela Sánchez said that compliance with the court decision increasing same-sex partners' right, "is not automatic, and we have to demand government measures to help the content of the ruling overcome prejudices, and to assist people who don’t know how to use what they have never had" [R2.8].

On 28 January 2009, the Constitutional Court ruled that gay and lesbian couples in Colombia are entitled to the same rights as straight couples in common-law marriages [R2.7].


In April 2008, Colombia’s Constitutional Court ruled that the government must extend pension benefits to same-sex partners, finding that to exclude same-sex partners would violate the principle of non-discrimination and human dignity as the expression of personal autonomy, protected by international law [R2.6].

Previously:

In 1996, the Colombian Constitutional Court was reported to have ruled that Lesbian and gay couples are barred from health, retirement and other state benefits granted to straight couples [R2.5].


On 11 October 2001, the Colombian Supreme Court issued a verdict in favor of conjugal visitation rights for Alba Nelly Montoya, a lesbian in prison, and her partner [C2.4] [R2.3].

The Court mandated that the director of Risaralda Women´s Prison - where Ms. Montoya is carrying her sentence - make all necessary arrangements for the lesbian visit to take place, in conditions that are equal to those of heterosexual visits, ruling that depriving lesbian inmates of conjugal visits violates their constitutionally protected rights to privacy (Article 15 of the Colombian Constitution), to freedom from discrimination based on sex, and to equality before the law (Article 13 of the Colombian Constitution).

The judges also stated that allowing conjugal visits to lesbian women in prison--under the same conditions of privacy and security required for heterosexual visits--constitutes no threat to the prison regime or to the well-being of other inmates or visitors, including children.


In November 2002, a judge in Manizales finally granted Marta Alvarez, a lesbian imprisoned in Caldas, visitation rights from her partner in Manizales [R2.2].

In granting the petition the judge invoked women's rights to equality, privacy and free development of their personalities.

Previously:

In May 2002, despite the Supreme Court decision in the Montoya Case (above) the Armenia Women's Jail continued to deny the right to conjugal visitations to the female partner of inmate Ms. Marta Lucia Alvarez Giraldo [R2.1].

The Marta Alvarez case (#11656) was heard at the Interamerican Commission on Human Rights (IAHRC) on October 1, 1999, after all legal recourses in Colombia had been exhausted over the preceding five years

R1.3 Colombia Reports: Same-sex unions in Colombia up in 2011 10 APR 12
R1.2 Gay.com UK: Colombia shelves gay rights legislation 29 AUG 03
R1.1 IGLHRC: Same-Sex Union/Anti-Discrimination Bill to be discussed at the Senate 09 APR 03
R2.9 The Advocate: Protests After Colombian Court Ruling 12 NOV 10
R2.8 PinkNews.co.uk: Increased rights for Colombian same-sex partners "not automatic"" 03 MAR 09
R2.7 PinkNews.co.uk: Colombian Court Confirms Equal Rights for Same-sex Couples 29 JAN 09
R2.6 365Gay.com: Colombia Court Gives More Rights To Gay Couples 17 APR 08
R2.5 Sydney Star Observer: Special Rights for Straights 14 MAR 96
C2.4 Alba Nelly Montoya Castrillión (Expediente No. 6600122100002001-0012-01, October 11 2001)
R2.3 IGLHRC: Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Conjugal Visitation Rights for Lesbian Inmate 16 OCT 01
R2.2 IGLHRC: Lesbian Inmate Finally Granted Visitation Rights 23 NOV 02
R2.1 IGLHRC: Discrimination in Prisons Must End 10 JUN 02
Discrimination Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

On 30 November 2011, a landmark anti-discrimination law (165/10 in the House of Representatives, 08/10 in the Senate), was signed into law by Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. For the first time, it levies prison sentences for acts of discrimination on the basis of ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation or nationality [R1.4].

Previously:

On 30 August 2011, an anti-discrimination bill that levies prison sentences of one to three years for acts of discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, political belief, or sexual orientation was approved by Congress and now awaits a signature from President Juan Manuel Santos [R1.3].

El Congreso de la República en 2011 se aprobó de la Ley Antidiscriminación , la cual incluye entre los tipos de discriminación la relativa a la orientación sexual e identidad de género [R1.3].

In 2007, discrimination in employment based on sexual orientation was made unlawful [R1.2].

Colombia's 1991 constitution promises equal rights for all citizens [R1.1].

2.

Courts & Tribunals

On 10 April 2017, the Constitutional Court reportedly ruled in favor of a Barranquilla man, the victim of verbal aggressions of neighbors. The Court noted the LGBT community is constitutionally protected and that such discriminatory acts go against the law and are unacceptable [R2.6].

On 26 February 2016, Inter-American Court of Human Rights ruled that Colombia violated the right to equality and non-discrimination of a gay man, who was denied a survivor pension after his partner had died, saying ''that no provision can diminish or limit a person’s rights on the basis of their sexual orientation''. It is the very first time the court has ruled on issues related to same-sex couples [C2.5], [R2.4].

On 25 May 2012, the Constitutional Court reportedly ruled the government cannot restrict gay couples' right to express affection in public. A security guard finding two men kissing in public and forcing them to leave a Cali mall showed 'discrimination that only affected gay couples' and was in violation of the couple's human rights [R2.3].


In September 1998, the Constitutional Court ruled that schoolteachers cannot be fired for revealing they are gay [R2.2].


In April 1998, the Constitutional Court ruled that private religious schools cannot ban gay students [R2.1].

R1.4 NDI: Colombian President Signs Anti-Discrimination Law 20 DEC 11
R1.3 Americas Quarterly: Colombian Congress Approves Landmark Social Inclusion Law 31 AUG 11
R1.2 ILGA: State-Sponsored Homophobia PDF 382.87kb, MAY 08
R1.1 PinkNews.co.uk: Colombian Court Confirms Equal Rights for Same-sex Couples 29 JAN 09
2. Courts & Tribunals
R2.6 ElEspectador (in Spanish): Llamar a un hombre ''mariquita'' es discriminatorio: Corte Constitucional 10 APR 17
C2.5 Sentenza (in Spanish): Case of Duque v. Colombia PDF 784.78kb 26 FEB 16
R2.4 ILGA LGBulletin#44: Inter-American Court of Human Rights holds Colombia accountable for violating right to equality and non-discrimination 15 APR 15
R2.3 GayStarNews: Colombia grants gay couples right to express affection publicly 27 MAY 12
R2.2 Associated Press: Gay Schoolteachers Cannot be Fired 10 SEP 98
R2.1 Capital Q: School's Gay Ban 09 APR 98

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Estates, Inheritance, Property, Succession, Wills Legislation/Cases/References
1.

Courts & Tribunals

On 20 April 2012, the Constitutional Court was reported to have ruled that “The part of the Constitution that treats the concept of family as solely the union between a man and a woman is blatantly wrong … ” and that same-sex couples legally constitute a family, affording them the same access to a partner's pension fund and compensation packages as heterosexual couples, if proof can be provided they had been living together [R1.6].


On 13 April 2011, the Constitutional Court approved 8–1 an amendment to the Civil Code which allows same-sex couples and unmarried life partners to inherit their partner's assets in the case of their death. The Court clarified, however, that the decision "only has economic effects" and that it does not alter the legal concept of a family that is in effect, namely the union between a man and a woman for the purpose of procreation [C1.5], [R1.4].


In 2007, the Constitutional Court ruled that gay and lesbian couples must have the same property rights as opposite-sex couples. In that case the court carefully noted the decision did not automatically permit civil unions. Colombia's Congress then passed legislation giving same-sex couples most of the same rights as opposite-sex married couples but the bill died in a procedural move by conservative senators. [R1.3].


In November 1999, the Joint Committee of the Superior Court of the Judicial District of Bogota (whose decision is final and obligatory) ruled that the judicial authority that must hear claims that involve economic disputes involving living or deceased homosexual couples is the judge of the District's Civil Court [R1.2].


In March 1999, the 6th Family Court of Santafe de Bogota ruled that Cristian had to be recognized as the sole inheritor of Dagoberto's possessions because he "had been the man’s partner by default after having lived in a gay relationship that had lasted more than four years" [R1.1].

R1.6 Colombia Reports: Colombia grants same-sex couples inheritance rights 20 APR 12
C1.5 DECISION T-283/11 Protection to the facto marital unions and the rights for same-sex couples
R1.4 Colombia Reports: Colombian homosexuals win right to inherit partner's assets 13 APR 11
R1.3 365Gay.com: Colombia Court Gives More Rights To Gay Couples 17 APR 08
R1.2 German Humberto Rincon Perfetti: Colombian Civil Court Ordered to Rule on Surviving Same Sex Partner Claim 17 NOV 99
R1.1 G & M De Colombia Abogados (Líderes en Acción): Colombian Family Court Rules in Favour of Homosexual Couple 03 MAR 99
Gender Identity, Intersex,
Transgender, Transexual

[?]
Legislation/Cases/References
1.

Courts & Tribunals

On 01 August 2016, it was reported that the Constitutional Court ordered the Seine in Barranquilla to respect the sexual identity of their students, allowing F2M transgender student Erika Gómez Comas to wear the uniform he wants to use [R1.6].

On 21 January 2016, M.P. Maria Victoria Street Correa in the Constitutional Court reaffirmed that trans women won't have the obligation to enlist for military service unless they want to: ''Under the principle of autonomy'', reads the court's press release, ''self-recognizing (as trans) is sufficient to be exempted from service'' [D1.5], [R1.4].

On 25 July 2013, the Constitutional Court in a custody ruling ordered the National Registry of Civil Status to correct a typing error [of] a citizen who despite being a woman in its charter appeared to be male [C1.3], [R1.2].

In October 2008, the Constitutional Court ruled that a five-year-old child born with both female and male genitals be allowed to choose their own gender [R1.1].

R1.6 Cucuta7dias (in Spanish): Transsexuals in the Seine may wear the uniform they want 01 AUG 16
D1.5 Press Release (in Spanish): I. Record D-10837 - Case C-006/16 (January 21) M.P. Maria Victoria Street Correa #1 PDF 438.03kb, 21 JAN 16
R1.4 ILGA Bulletin #33 22-28: Colombia: trans women exonerated from compulsory military service, court reaffirms 28 JAN 16
C1.3 Judgment: Care Action Against National Civil Registry T-485/13 (in Spanish), 25 JUL 13
R1.2 Constitutional Court: Registraduría deberá corregir cambio de sexo a una mujer 25 JUL 13
R1.1 MCV: Child to Choose Sex 16 OCT 08
Health, Medical Legislation/Cases/References
1.

Courts & Tribunals

On 26 March 2012, the Constitutional Court ruled in favor of allowing gays to donate blood, ordering that Higuera Escalante testing laboratory's medical personnel will make future decisions based on a donor's sexual behavior, not their sexual orientation [C1.2], [R1.1].

C1.2 Constitutional Court: Protection Action established by Julian against Clinical Laboratory Higuera Escalante T-248/12 (in Spanish) 26 MAR 12
R1.1 GayStarMews: Colombia Courts say clinics can't stop gays donating blood 06 JUN 12
Homosexuality, Sodomy Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

In 1981, consensual sex between same-sex couples was decriminalised [R1].

R1 ILGA: State-Sponsored Homophobia PDF 382.87kb, MAY 08
Marriage Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

On 13 June 2017, it was reported that the polygamous ''marriage'' of three men (actor Victor Hugo Prada, sports instructor John Alejandro Rodriguez and journalist Manuel Jose Bermudez) had been formally reconized for the first time (apparently by the signing legal papers with a solicitor in the city of Medellin, establishing them as a family unit with inheritance rights). GayLawNet(R)(TM) doubts that the law in Colombia would recognise the men as ''married'' as under Colombian law a person cannot marry if they are already married to another person [R1.5].

On 04 February 2016, it was reported that Colombian Julián Castro and his Spanish husband Julián Artacho, whom he married in Barcelona, were the first couple to have their marriage registered in the country [R1.4].

See now: Courts & Tribunals at [R2.6].

On 24 April 2013, the Senate rejected a marriage equality bill 51-17, defying a mandate by the nation's highest court to extend same-sex couples all the benefits of marriage [R1.3].

On 20 November 2011, Congress was reported to be considering four bills on gay unions after the Constitutional Court ordered legislation be introduced by July 20, 2013, or then “gay couples can go to a notary and with the same solemnity of a heterosexual marriage, enter a union similar to one between a heterosexual couple” [R1.2].

On 11 December 1998, the first marriage contract with full legal rights between two homosexual men took place at Notary Office #46 of Santafe de Bogota (where heterosexual civil marriages also take place), the capital of Colombia [R1.1].

2.

Courts & Tribunals

On 07 April 2016, the Constitutional Court ruled 6-3 that same-sex couples have the right to marry [R2.6].

On 22 July 2013, the Constitutional Court was reported to have responded to Inspector General Alejandro Ordóñez's petition to restrict gay marriage, admonishing him to “observe the determinations of this Court and monitor their strict and timely compliance” and that he should “maintain decorum” when addressing the court [R2.5].

On 12 July 2013, with the passing of the Constitutional Court's deadline on 20 June 2013, Judge Carmen Lucía Rodríguez Díaz in Bagotá was reported to have decreed that the wedding between same-sex couple Diego and Juan (Gonzalo Ruiz, 44 and Carlos Hernando Rivera, 57) could take place on July 24 [R2.4].

On 26 July 2011, the Constitutional Court ruled the issue of marriage for same-sex couples is a legislative matter that must be taken up in Congress. The court gave the Congress two years to legislate the status of same-sex marriages. If the deadline passes with no legislation, then same-sex couples will be able to formalize their unions before a notary public [C2.3], [R2.2].

On 11 November 2010, the Constitutional Court refused to rule in the same-sex marriage case seeking to strike language from the Civil Code that defines marriage as a contract between a man and a woman. In a 5–4 vote, the court said, "The charges of violation of the rights to equality, to free development of the personality and to not receive cruel or degrading treatment, alleged by the plaintiffs, were not sufficiently argued." As the case was dismissed on technical grounds, it may be refiled at any time [R2.1].

R1.5 TheWeeklyObserever: Colombia: For the first time a marriage of three people was recognized 13 JUN 17
R1.4 ILGA: First same-sex marriage contracted abroad registered in Colombia 04 MAR 16
R1.3 The Advocate: Colombian Senate Votes Down Marriage Equality 24 APR 13
R1.2 OnTop Magazine: Colombia Considers Four Bills On Gay Marriage, Civil Unions 20 NOV 11
R1.1 German Humberto Rincon Perfetti, Lawyer: First Homosexual Marriage with Full Legal Rights in Columbia 15 DEC 98
2. Courts $ Tribunals
R2.6 WashingtonBlade: Colombia high court rules in favor of same-sex marriage 07 APR 16
R2.5 Xtra!: Columbian court rejects inspector general’s bid to sidestep marriage 22 JUL 13
R2.4 BuzzFeed: First Same-Sex Couple Wins Marriage Suit In Colombia 12 JUL 13
C2.3 Constitutional Court: DECISION C-577/11 The homosexuals have the right to form a family PDF 129.27kb, 19 AUG 11
R2.2 CNN: Colombian court says Congress must decide on gay marriage 27 JUL 11
R2.1 PinkPaper.com: Colombian high court refuses to rule on same-sex marriage 16 NOV 10
Military Legislation/Cases/References
1.

Courts & Tribunals

On 21 January 2016, M.P. Maria Victoria Street Correa in the Constitutional Court reaffirmed that trans women won't have the obligation to enlist for military service unless they want to: ''Under the principle of autonomy'', reads the court's press release, ''self-recognizing (as trans) is sufficient to be exempted from service'' [D1.3], [R1.2].

On 14 July 1999, the Constitutional Court ruled unanimously that the armed forces cannot bar homosexuals. The existing ban violated gay soldiers' constitutional rights to intimacy, free development of one's personality, and defence of one's family. [R1.1].

D1.3 Press Release (in Spanish): I. Record D-10837 - Case C-006/16 (January 21) M.P. Maria Victoria Street Correa #1 PDF 438.03kb, 21 JAN 16
R1.2 ILGA Bulletin #33 22-28: Colombia: trans women exonerated from compulsory military service, court reaffirms 28 JAN 16
R1.1 Melbourne Star Observer: Colombian Court OKs Gays in the Military 30 JUL 99
Parenting, Adoption, Fostering Legislation/Cases/References
1.

National

On 29 January 2016, it was reported that the Colombian Civil Registry Office had allowed same-sex couple Juliana González and her partner, the biological mother, Carla to jointly register 7-month old Luciana with the civil registry [R1.1].

2.

Courts & Tribunals

On 04 November 2015, the the Plenary chamber of the Constitutional Court ruled 6-2 that there is no impediment to impede same-sex couples from embarking on the same adoption process as heterosexual couples [C2.9], [R2.8].

On 18 January 2015, Judge José Roberto Herrera for the Colombian Constitutional Court narrowly ruled 5-4 that homosexual couples can adopt but only if the child is the biological offspring of one of the partners in the relationship [C2.7], [R2.6].

On 28 August 2014, the Colombian Constitutional Court reportedly allowed Veronica Botero to adopt two children born to her partner Ana Leiderman via artificial insemination. Botero however doesn't have any custodial or legal rights over the children [R2.5].


On 23 May 2012, the Constitutional Court ruled in favor of Chandler Burr, a gay American who was previously blocked from taking his legally adopted sons out of the country and guaranting him custody of them [R2.4].

Previously:

On 23 January 2012, the Constitutional Court reportedly would hear the case of an American gay man Chandler Burr, who adopted of two boys in the country, to decide whether a gay person may adopt and whether a potential adoptive parent must disclose his or her sexual orientation [R2.3].

On 12 December 2011, a family court judge in Bogota ordered the Colombian Family Welfare Institute (ICBF) to return two Colombian children adopted by a US citizen, Chandler Burr, after they were removed because of his homosexuality. [R2.2].


On 01 March 2011, the Constitutional Court announced that it needs more time to rule on the legality of same-sex couples adopting children – studying the case of a lesbian couple who want one partner to be recognized as the legal guardian of the other's child [R2.1].

R1.1 LatinPost: Colombia Permits Same-Sex Couple to Jointly Register Child 29 JAN 16
C2.9 Comunicado No. 50 (in Spanish): La Corte Constitucional determinó que las parejas del mismo sexo estn habilitadas ara adoptar conjuntamente Expediente D-10372 Sentencia C-683/15 PDF 527.86kb 04 NOV 15
R2.8 BuenosAiresHerald: Colombian court approves adoption by homosexual couples 05 NOV 15
C2.7 Judgment (in Spanish): Expediente D-10.315 C-071/15 PDF 218.38kb, 18 FEB 15
R2.6 LatinAmericanHeraldTribune: Colombian Constitutional Court Approves Limited Homosexual Adoption 19 FEB 15
R2.5 LGBTQ Nation: Colombia allows lesbian partner to adopt child born via artificial insemination 28 AUG 14
R2.4 GayStarNews: American gay dad wins Colombian custody battle 23 MAY 12
R2.3 The Advocate: Colombian High Court to Hear American Gay Adoption Case 23 JAN 12
R2.2 La Opinion (in Spanish): Judge authorizes the adoption of two U.S. gay Colombian children
R2.1 Colombia Reports: Court needs more time for gay adoption ruling 02 MAR 11

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